I need coffee.

whistlecat:

davaistoi:

the-more-u-know:

I know this is not health related but how cool are these products? :P

[Source]

A couch that looks like pancakes. oh.

PANCAKE PILLOWS.

necroticnymph:

briansandstorm:

That awkward moment when Diablo shows up to your religious protest

This reminds me of an old story I heard from a friend. One year, an anime con was being held the same weekend as a Bible Conference. This dude in an Ifrit costume, stilts and all, gets into the elevator, all hunched over, on his way down to the lobby. Before he could reach the lobby, the elevator stopped on another floor. Two old ladies clutching bibles were about to step on when they see this giant red demon-creature with glowing yellow eyes.

And in his deepest voice he says, “Going down?”

They shrieked and ran off to find another elevator.

dskzero:

The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but someday the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age.

H.P. Lovecraft: The Call of Cthulhu

crassetination:

Cyberpunk 70

plush:

WOAH! I never knew this one tattoo had these many secrets. Oh my god, the police should really take notice lol
Here are a few tattoo linkies and decrypt their meaning! 
Prison Tattoos and Their Secret Meanings
Worst Tattoo Spelling Fails (LOL at #10) 
Amazing 3D Tattoo Designs
Gorgeous White Ink Tattoos
Most Unbelievable Tattoos
20 Tattoos You Should Get Removed
Hope you enjoyed this! I’m gonna be getting a white ink tattoo soon for sure 

plush:

WOAH! I never knew this one tattoo had these many secrets. Oh my god, the police should really take notice lol

Here are a few tattoo linkies and decrypt their meaning! 

Hope you enjoyed this! I’m gonna be getting a white ink tattoo soon for sure 

micdotcom:

At-home 3-D printer can make items out of used plastic bottles

The new Ekocycle Cube 3D Printer from Cubify, which uses filament cartridges produced from three recycled 20 oz. PET plastic bottles, will cost around $1,200 and come out later this year on Cubify. The material supposedly has the durability of standard 3-D printer filament. And it’s made by will.i.am, 3D Systems’ chief creative officer, so that’s fun too.

Read more | Follow micdotcom

knightofbreath:

TINY WORKING COMPUTER

knightofbreath:

TINY WORKING COMPUTER

vivianvivisection:

sinidentidades:

Massachusetts SWAT teams claim they’re private companies and don’t have to tell you anything
After the ACLU sent open records requests as part of its investigative report on police militarization, SWAT teams in Massachusetts claimed they were exempt because they were private corporations.
Some SWAT teams in the state operate as law enforcement councils (LECs) which are funded by several police departments and overseen by an executive board largely made up of local police chiefs.
Member police departments pay annual membership dues to the LECs which share technology and oversee crime scene investigators or other specialists.
Some of these LECs have also incorporated 501(c)(3) organizations, which they say exempts them from open records requests.
“Let’s be clear,” wrote Radley Balko for The Washington Post. “These agencies oversee police activities. They employ cops who carry guns, wear badges, collect paychecks provided by taxpayers and have the power to detain, arrest, injure, and kill. They operate SWAT teams, which conduct raids on private residences. And yet they say that because they’ve incorporated, they’re immune to Massachusetts open records laws. The state’s residents aren’t permitted to know how often the SWAT teams are used, what they’re used for, what sort of training they get or who they’re primarily used against.”
The ACLU reported earlier this week that about 240 of the 351 police departments in Massachusetts belong to an LEC, which are set up as corporations but are funded by local and federal taxpayer funds.
“Police departments and regional SWAT teams are public institutions, working with public money, meant to protect and serve the public’s interest,” the ACLU said in its report. “If these institutions do not maintain and make public comprehensive and comprehensible documents pertaining to their operations and tactics, the people cannot judge whether officials are acting appropriately or make needed policy changes when problems arise.”
The ACLU sued the North Eastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council, which has about 50 member agencies, saying the LEC used government grants and taxpayer funds to purchase its equipment.
“NEMLEC can’t have it both ways,” said ACLU attorney Jessie Rossman. “Either it is a public entity subject to public records laws, or what it is doing is illegal.”
The ACLU survey found that only 7% of SWAT missions involved incidents they were originally designed to handle – such as hostage situations or shootings – while 62% of their mission involved drug searches.

ah yes, capitalism

vivianvivisection:

sinidentidades:

Massachusetts SWAT teams claim they’re private companies and don’t have to tell you anything

After the ACLU sent open records requests as part of its investigative report on police militarization, SWAT teams in Massachusetts claimed they were exempt because they were private corporations.

Some SWAT teams in the state operate as law enforcement councils (LECs) which are funded by several police departments and overseen by an executive board largely made up of local police chiefs.

Member police departments pay annual membership dues to the LECs which share technology and oversee crime scene investigators or other specialists.

Some of these LECs have also incorporated 501(c)(3) organizations, which they say exempts them from open records requests.

“Let’s be clear,” wrote Radley Balko for The Washington Post. “These agencies oversee police activities. They employ cops who carry guns, wear badges, collect paychecks provided by taxpayers and have the power to detain, arrest, injure, and kill. They operate SWAT teams, which conduct raids on private residences. And yet they say that because they’ve incorporated, they’re immune to Massachusetts open records laws. The state’s residents aren’t permitted to know how often the SWAT teams are used, what they’re used for, what sort of training they get or who they’re primarily used against.”

The ACLU reported earlier this week that about 240 of the 351 police departments in Massachusetts belong to an LEC, which are set up as corporations but are funded by local and federal taxpayer funds.

“Police departments and regional SWAT teams are public institutions, working with public money, meant to protect and serve the public’s interest,” the ACLU said in its report. “If these institutions do not maintain and make public comprehensive and comprehensible documents pertaining to their operations and tactics, the people cannot judge whether officials are acting appropriately or make needed policy changes when problems arise.”

The ACLU sued the North Eastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council, which has about 50 member agencies, saying the LEC used government grants and taxpayer funds to purchase its equipment.

“NEMLEC can’t have it both ways,” said ACLU attorney Jessie Rossman. “Either it is a public entity subject to public records laws, or what it is doing is illegal.”

The ACLU survey found that only 7% of SWAT missions involved incidents they were originally designed to handle – such as hostage situations or shootings – while 62% of their mission involved drug searches.

ah yes, capitalism